The New Message: “Don’t Text and Drive”

A “texting” driver is 23 times more likely to have a motor vehicle collision than a driver who is not texting, according to the non-profit Ad Council.

A “texting” driver is 23 times more likely to have a motor vehicle collision than a driver who is not texting, according to the non-profit Ad Council.

For decades, “don’t drink and drive” has been the major public service announcement linked to driving a vehicle. Yes, people driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is still a problem. However, in many communities people text messaging and driving is becoming a serious and sometimes fatal issue.

A “texting” driver is 23 times more likely to have a motor vehicle collision than a driver who is not texting, according to the non-profit Ad Council. Driving while intexticated is causing just as many car crashes in Kentucky and other parts of the United States as driving under the influence, according to Boyle County Fire Chief Donnie Sexton. An estimated 11 American teenagers die each day due to accidents caused by texting and driving and the number of adult fatalities might be even higher.

“Driving while intoxicated” is illegal in 33 states plus the District of Columbia. Reading text messages is just as dangerous as composing texts on the road. People of any age who text while operating a motor vehicle are about six times more likely to cause a car accident than someone driving under the traditional influence, warns the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration.

No one is invincible regardless of age, driving ability, education, or other training. Always remember that serious injury or even death can occur from cell phone use on the road, whether you are talking on it, reading a text, or creating a text. The best thing you can do for you and your loved ones’ physical and mental health is to not use your cell phone in any way while you are driving a vehicle

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